Second Step Program and SEL Research

We take great pride in the fact that our programs are based on the current research in the field. Translating research into our programs is a key component in the development of our curriculum. This allows us to be more confident that our programs will be effective once implemented in classrooms. In addition, we are committed to evaluating our programs for effectiveness through randomized control trials. Only through these research trials can we be certain that our programs meet their intended objectives. Through rigorous research in the development of our programs and by evaluating the outcomes of our programs, we strive to provide a truly effective curriculum that helps children improve their social and emotional skills and makes them successful in school and in life.

Current Randomized Control Trials


Second Step Early Learning Program

A 64-classroom randomized control trial is being conducted in Massachusetts by Dr. Carole Upshur (University of Massachusetts Medical School) to evaluate the effect of the Second Step Early Learning curriculum on young children’s end-of-preschool social skills, emotion regulation, executive functioning, and academic readiness skills, and how these affect kindergarten-readiness screening and kindergarten performance.

Second Step Elementary Program

A 62-school randomized control trial of the Second Step K–5 program is being conducted in Washington and Arizona by Dr. Clay Cook (University of Washington) and Dr. Sabina Low (Arizona State University). The main goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the Second Step program in terms of academic outcomes, problem behavior, and social-emotional skills.

Second Step Bullying Prevention Unit

Dr. Dorothy Espelage (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) and Dr. Todd Little (Texas Tech University) are assessing the impact of the K–5 Second Step Bullying Prevention Unit in a randomized control trial involving 108 classrooms across nine K–5 schools in Illinois. In particular, they are examining the impact of the program on bullying and peer victimization.

Program Outcomes


Elementary
(conducted with the 2002 edition of the Second Step program)

Less Adult Conflict Intervention, Improved Social Competence

Frey, K. S., Nolen, S. B., Edstrom, L. V., & Hirschstein, M. K. (2005). Effects of a school-based social-emotional competence program: Linking children’s goals, attributions, and behavior. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 26, 171–200.

A study examined the effects of the Second Step program on 1,253 second- through fourth-grade children. When compared to children in a control group, those who participated in the Second Step program showed greater improvement in teacher ratings of their social competence, were less aggressive, and were more likely to choose positive goals.
Read more about this study.


Gains in Prosocial Skills and Behavior

Edwards, D., Hunt, M. H., Meyers, J., Grogg, K. R., & Jarrett, O. (2005). Acceptability and student outcomes of a violence prevention curriculum. The Journal of Primary Prevention, 26, 401–418. doi:10.1007/s10935-005-0002-z

A pre-post design of 455 fourth- and fifth-grade students in a small urban school district was studied to evaluate the efficacy of the Second Step curriculum. After students received the Second Step program they showed significant gains in knowledge about social-emotional skills. Report card data also revealed modest gains in prosocial behavior.
Read more about this study.

Middle School

Physical Aggression 42 Percent Less Likely

Espelage, D. L., Low, S., Polanin, J. R., & Brown, E. C. (2013). The impact of a middle school program to reduce aggression, victimization, and sexual violence. Journal of Adolescent Health, 53(2), 180–186.

Thirty-six middle schools in the Chicago and Wichita areas participated in an evaluation of the Second Step Middle School program. Schools in the study were randomly assigned to teach either the Second Step program or be control schools. After one year, sixth-graders in schools that implemented the Second Step program were 42 percent less likely to say they were involved in physical aggression compared to sixth-graders in schools that did not implement the program.
Read more about this study.


20 percent reduction in bullying by students with disabilities

Espelage, D. L., Polanin, J. R., & Rose, C. A. (2015, in press). Social-emotional learning program to reduce bullying, fighting, and victimization among middle school students with disabilities. Remedial and Special Education, doi: 10.1177/0741932514564564

This three-year study followed 123 students with disabilities from sixth through eighth grades. The 47 students in the intervention group received Second Step lessons during these three years. The control group of 76 students received no Second Step lessons. The study found that bullying by students with disabilities decreased by one-fifth during this three-year period of middle school among the intervention group participating in the Second Step program.
Read more about this study.

Making the Case for Social-Emotional Learning (SEL)


SEL Programs Studied Return $11 for Every $1 Invested

Belfied, C., Bowden, B., Klapp, A., Levin, H., Shand, R., & Zander, S. (2015). The Economic Value of Social and Emotional Learning. New York: Center for Benefit-Cost Studies in Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.

This pioneering report from Columbia University details a benefit-cost analysis evaluating six SEL interventions (including the Second Step program) that shows an average return on investment of $11 for every dollar spent. Until now there has been little-to-no data to show policymakers and grant givers the economic benefits of SEL curriculum. The researchers acknowledge the limitations of imprecise data and say their conservative estimates may not capture the full benefits of the SEL programs evaluated. Known benefits of the interventions studied include: reductions in child aggression, substance abuse, delinquency, and violence; lower levels of depression and anxiety; and increased grades, attendance, and performance in core academic subjects.
Read the full report.

Schoolwide Gains in SEL

Durlak, J. A., Weissberg, R. P., Dymnicki, A. B., Taylor, R. D., & Schellinger, K. B. (2011). The impact of enhancing students’ social and emotional learning: A meta-analysis of school-based universal interventions. Child Development, 82(1): 405–432.

A meta-analysis of 213 school-based, universal social-emotional learning (SEL) programs was conducted. Compared to controls, SEL participants demonstrated significantly improved social and emotional skills, attitudes, behavior, and academic performance that reflected an 11-percentile-point gain in achievement.
Read more about this meta-analysis.

How SEL Helps Prevent Bullying

Smith, B. H., & Low, S. (2013). The role of social-emotional learning in bullying prevention efforts. Theory Into Practice, 52(4), 280–287. doi:10.1080/00405841.2013.829731

Research has shown that building the social-emotional competence of students is an important component of effective bullying prevention. This article examines how social-emotional learning (SEL) contributes to bullying prevention efforts in schools and discusses specific SEL skills that can be taught to students to help prevent bullying.
Read the article.

SECOND STEP

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Elementary School

Middle School

Bullying Prevention Unit

Child Protection Unit

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