Committee for Children Blog

Week 1: Tuesday’s Summer Camp Activities

Happy girl and boy, free DYI SEL activities, Tuesday Week 1, math, science

This summer, your kids may have a lot of big feelings. Our DIY SEL Summer Camp is here to help! This three-week summer camp includes research-based activities that are modeled on our Second Step social-emotional learning (SEL) program and help your kids learn about science, social studies, math, and more. The activities also teach social-emotional skills that can help all kids ages 1–14 cope with big feelings and other challenges they may face. 

With age-appropriate instructions and easy-to-find household materials, these activities can help you and your family spend quality time together and keep your kids learning over the summer.


PreK

Learn to Count with Self-Talk

SEL Skill: Focusing, listening, self-talk

What You’ll Need

Directions
Have your child turn on their attent-o-scope and listen carefully to what you say.

  1. Hold up the first object and say “one” out loud as you place it in the container. Have your child repeat the number out loud and then quietly to themselves. Show them there is now one object in the container.
  2. Repeat with the next two objects, counting up to three. Then take the objects out of the container and repeat the process.
  3. Have your child count without your help. Add or subtract the number of objects you use as your child is ready. Then have your child count objects into their own container.

Kindergarten–Grade 1

Learning Numbers with Your Attent-o-scope

SEL Skill: Focusing, listening, self-talk

What You’ll Need

Directions
Have your child turn on their attent-o-scope and listen carefully to what you say.

  1. Count out loud or write the number sequence you want them to learn (for example, counting to 20 by ones, twos, or fives).
  2. Have your child repeat the number sequence you just gave them quietly to themselves several times. Then have them repeat the number sequence out loud.

Grades 2–3

Data on Skill Use

SEL Skill: Focusing, listening, self-talk

What You’ll Need

Directions
Have your child keep track of how often they use their skills for learning (focus attention, be assertive, use self-talk, and listen) in one day by making marks on the worksheet in the Tally column.

At the end of the day, have them add up their tally marks in the frequency column of the worksheet to see how often they used their skills for learning.

Have your child monitor their use of these skills for three consecutive days. Then, have them total all the data in the frequency table. Help your child plot their data on the graph page of the worksheet, representing their overall use of skills for the three-day period.

Grades 4–5

What Can a Can Teach Us?

SEL Skill: Perspective-taking

What You’ll Need

  • A can of food
  • Pen or pencil
  • Paper

Directions
Have your child make observations about shapes from different perspectives. Pick an object that has a shape such as a can of food (cylinder), an apple (circle), or a box (prism).

Place the item on a table or counter. Then, have your child look at it from the side, at an angle, and from above. Have your child draw what they see from each point of view.

Talk with your child about how the different perspectives can result in different interpretations. Ask your child: How are the views different?

For example, if your child were to look at the can from the side, it would appear to be a rectangle. If they looked at it from above or below, it would look like a circle. But, when your child looks at it from an angle, they can see it’s actually a cylinder.

Middle School

Are You Considering the Other Side’s Perspective?

SEL Skill: Perspective-taking

What You’ll Need

  • Paper
  • Pen or pencil
  • Age-appropriate science websites and search engines

Directions
Choose a controversial practice in the scientific world, such as protecting endangered species or drilling for oil in sensitive environments.

Have your child research arguments for and against the practice using the preselected websites or search engines. Then, have your child create a script between two fictional characters that captures the different points of view on the practice.