Child Protection Tools for Educators

Abuse Prevention in the Classroom and Beyond

Educators, research shows that when you partner with parents to talk with students about sexual abuse (and teach them important safety skills they can practice at school and at home), you improve their ability to protect themselves and disclose abuse if it happens.1 We encourage you to share our Hot Chocolate Talk resources with families so you can work together to break down communication barriers and help prevent child sexual abuse.

As educators, you are central to this multi-layered approach to child protection. For students who don’t get adequate information at home, you may be their only source of information about personal safety, and you may also be the one to first notice signs of abuse. That’s why we offer comprehensive tools and training just for you in our Second Step Child Protection Unit (available for Early Learning through Grade 5), which you may or may not already use.

Additional Resources

The following resources explain the Hot Chocolate Talk campaign and provide you with tools to engage families and help them start these important safety conversations.

Sample Letter to Families

Introduce the Hot Chocolate Talk campaign to families with this customizable message.
Download Now

Learn and Share the Facts

When parents and educators work together, we can help prevent child sexual abuse.
Share This Video with Families

Educators Are Essential

Learn the three reasons why you play a key role in protecting children from sexual abuse.
Read Now

Recommended Reading

Get our list of books to share with parents for talking about and responding to child sexual abuse.
See Book List

Where to Get Help

If abuse happens, report it to your local police or child protection agency. Then get help: these resources provide trained, confidential support.

Childhelp
Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network
National Sexual Violence Resource Center
National Human Trafficking Hotline

Spread the Word

Feel free to share this image and sample post content in your school communications and social media channels. Together, prevention is possible.

or share now:
1Finkelhor, D., & Dziuba-Leatherman, J. (1995). Victimization prevention programs: A national survey of children’s exposure and reactions. Child Abuse & Neglect, 19(2), 129–139.