Class Meeting: Different from You—Activity

Discuss and Understand Differences in People and How to Come Together

free activity, social emotional learning, second step

Grades 6-8

At Committee for Children, we strive to foster the safety and well-being of children through social-emotional learning and development. Part of that goal is to teach students about diversity and inclusivity. This exercise, which is adapted from one of our Second Step Middle School Program’s Advisory Activities, helps students talk about what may be challenging about understanding other people’s differences and how to accept and celebrate them.

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Objective: Examine the benefits of having friends who are different

Preparation

If possible, seat the class in a circle.

Sit where you can participate comfortably in the discussion.

Class Meeting Instructions

Warm-Up

Have everyone in the class (including you!) briefly answer the following question: Are your friends similar to you or different from you?

Discussion

As a class, discuss one or more of the following prompts:

What can make it difficult to make friends with someone who is a different gender, race, or ethnicity?

How can you overcome these difficulties?

Tell us about a friendship you have with someone who’s different from you.

Why is this friendship important?

Reflection

Have the class reflect quietly about the following prompt:

What are some benefits of being friends with people who are different from you?

Call on students to tell the class their ideas, as time allows.

Find more activities in the curriculum section of our blog, and other resources and information for the Second Step Program at SecondStep.org.


Like this activity?

We’re adding more K-8 classroom activities to our Free Activities page all the time. They’re easy to find—just visit cfchildren.org/resources/free-activities/ for grade-specific, K-8 classroom activities that align with our Second Step Suite.


Learn more about social-emotional learning, research on the topic, and how it benefits students in the classroom, at home, and in their daily lives.