Committee for Children Blog

How to Support Your Child When Tragedy Strikes

It's imperative that parents be prepared and informed on how to respond when children witness or experience human tragedies or national disasters. Blogger Melissa Benaroya walks us through how to use social emotional learning to help in these situations.

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The Power of the Dad-Daughter Dynamic

Conversations about the critical role of fathers usually centers around sons, but just in time for Father’s Day, blogger Melissa Benaroya explores dads and the impact they have on their daughters.

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Screen Time: Setting Limits That Work

One of the biggest challenges for parents these days is managing their children’s screen time. Screens are the source of many power struggles for modern families. As a parent or caregiver, it&r… Read More


Screen Time: Setting Limits That Work

May 2-8 is Screen Free Week, and we're hoping children, families, and communities around the world will rediscover the joys of life beyond the screen. Blogger, Melissa Benaroya walks us through the importance of setting limits that work.

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Three Strategies to Ensure a Successful Spring Break

Whether you are sticking around the house,
traveling abroad, or playing tourist in your own town, there are bound to
be parenting challenges or tough moments that arise over the break. All the “together
time” can be fun and create wonderful memories, but because dynamics tend to
change when kids are out of their normal school routine, it also has the
potential to create stress. Here are a few reminders to help you avoid and
manage common challenges so you can enjoy the time together while contributing
to your teen's social and emotional development.

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Talking to Children About Terrorism

How can parents and those who regularly interact with children best communicate about terrorism and other violent tragedies? Committee for Children, creator of the Second Step social-emotional learning program, has compiled resources to assist with and help navigate these tough conversations.

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Experience Required: The Key to Early Brain Development

You've
probably heard it a million times: A child's brain needs stimulation to help it
develop. Actually, it’s not that simple. What a young child’s developing brain
really needs is interaction. Although
some brain development is genetic, much of it is influenced by experience and
interactions. The brain needs and
relies on experience. Children learn to process information through
relationships with parents and caregivers, especially in the early years. That's
why watching an educational show is not as enriching or stimulating as one
might think.

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A Parent’s Guide to Role-Playing Bullying Reports

Bullying is serious. Make sure your child knows that it is important to practice reporting the way he or she would do it in real life. When you and your child practice giving and receiving reports, you’ll have the skills and confidence to handle bullying if it really happens. When your child reports bullying, it is most important to really listen and ensure your child’s safety. The following are steps you can take when your child comes to you about a bullying situation.

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Inside Out: A Parent’s Guide to Viewing & Teaching SEL Skills

The recently released Pixar/Disney film Inside Out is a wonderful opportunity for families not only to enjoy an entertaining movie together, but also to have really valuable conversations about the importance of all emotions, what purpose they serve, and how best to express them. Movies such as Inside Out can serve as a valuable tool to teaching social-emotional learning (SEL) and enhance verbal skills when parents are thoughtful about the conversations they have with their children before, during, and after viewing such a film together.

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